Drift Creek Covered Bridge | Oregon Coast

Drift Creek Bridge

• Drift Creek Covered Bridge originally was built over Drift Creek
• The oldest of the remaining covered bridges in Oregon



The oldest of the remaining covered bridges in Oregon, Drift Creek Covered Bridge was constructed in 1914 over the Drift Creek serving the traffic on Drift Creek County Road along the Oregon Coast. Previously located 1.5 miles south of Lincoln City, the bridge was destroyed by floods in the 1930s and three years later rebuilt.

By this time the American road system has evolved and new roads, highways, and bridges were built. The Roosevelt Military Highway or Highway 101 was constructed in the 1920s; the Salmon River Highway or Highway 18 was built in 1932.

In 1960, an alternative concrete bridge crosses the Drift Creek. The Drift Creek Covered Bridge was preserved as a historic monument dedicated to Lincoln County pioneers and used for pedestrian traffic. Due to the deteriorating and dangerous conditions, the bridge was closed in 1988.

Drift Creek BridgeLocal residents and land's owners Laura and Kerry Sweitz offered to move the bridge to their Rose Lodge property located at the Bear Creek. The historic covered bridge was reopened to the public in July 2001 thanks to the Sweitz family, many fundraisers, and volunteers.

Drift Creek Bridge was added to the National Register Places in 1998.



Drift Creek Covered Bridge | General Description

Architectural Bridge Design: Howe truss
Bridge access:
Pedestrian
Stream:
Bear Creek
Bridge Length:
66 ft (20 m)
Built:
1914
Replaced: 2000
Reopened: 2001

Open: Year-round

Drift Creek Bridge is located:

  • 11 miles east of Lincoln City
  • 50 miles west of Salem
  • 77 miles southwest of Portland
  • 112 miles northwest of Eugene.

Directions

From Lincoln City,

  • Take US-101 and follow 5 miles north to OR-18
  • Turn left onto highway 18 and drive 4.9 miles to North Bear Creek Road
  • Turn left (south) and continue 0.9 miles to the destination on the left.

Navigation Link***





Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.